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2012

June 12

posted Jun 12, 2013, 6:00 AM by Peter Knowles

Finals schedule

 Thursday, June 13 Pd 4 Final (8:15-9:45)   Pd 6 Final (12:50-2:20)
   
 Friday, June 14 Pd 1 Final (8:15-10:00) Pd 3 Final (10:15-12:00)

World History Final: 2013

All year long you’ve been asked to conduct various levels of research writing, where you respond to a question about some aspect of history, and you then explain how YOU understand the material in your answer. When you do this, you need to show the source of all your information using standard research practices, using in-text citations, lists of works cited, and reference formats following a particular set of rules.

Your course final will focus on all these skills, so it’s time to figure them out if you haven’t already.

In the (few) days ahead, we’ll be doing a number of short activities to help you understand (if you don’t already) how to complete all these research steps correctly, and how to recognize when others make mistakes in those areas.

THE FINAL TEST WILL NOT BE OPEN NOTE (You won’t even have your Chromebooks! and all those helpful posters on the wall will be gone) so if you haven’t internalized the rules by now, pay attention, make good use of this time to practice, and get ready by studying for your course final. It’s your last chance to improve your grade...or keep your grade where you want it.


To do well, you’ll need to know:

  1. What makes a good thesis statement?
  2. What kind of information needs to be cited?
  3. How do you create clear and accurate citations?
  4. How do you blend information from multiple sources in a single paragraph?
  5. What kind of information goes in citations?
  6. What kind of punctuation is used for citations?
  7. How do you create references for common types of sources?
  8. What are the proper formats and titles for reference lists?
  9. What kinds of formats are used to identify your sources?
  10. How do references and citations work together to show the source of your information?
  11. What is a primary source? (More here)
  12. How do you use primary sources?

June 10

posted Jun 10, 2013, 5:38 AM by Peter Knowles

Day 85--

Learning Target ImageWhat will I be able to do when I've finished this lesson?How will I  accomplish this task?  How will I show that I have done this?How well will I have to do this?
 I will understand how to accurately collect and cite information for academic research.I will work with a group to collect information from a web page.  I will create accurate notecards to show what I've found on the web pageThis is a formative assessment to review and prepare for my final. 


REMEMBER YOUR DEADLINES:
ANY LATE ASSESSMENTS were due FRIDAY, June 7 at midnight. IF YOU HAVEN'T TURNED IN AN ASSESSMENT THIS SEMESTER THE DEADLINE HAS PASSED. 
You may still turn in rewrites/regrades of assessments you've turned in. If you haven't received the scored assessment yet, you'll be receiving it today, tomorrow, or Wednesday. You'll have until Sunday, June 16 to turn in rewrites/regrades for inclusion in your second semester grade.

ALSO: All retakes of any TESTS must be completed by June 11 (tomorrow). Mr Knowles will be available at lunch on Monday, and Tuesday to give them, or after school on those dates, by appointment. 


Today we'll continue our review of research and writing practices in preparation for this week's final. 

Last week you had a chance to review some important skills in this area:
  • Wednesday you created a perfect reference listing for an Internet resource
  • Thursday you collected a quotation, paraphrase, and a summary using that resource
  • Friday you created a perfect reference list using your own and classmates' references
Now it's time to use some of that information while reviewing procedures for citations and use of information. 
Here's what you need to do:
  1. Find one or two other students you'd like to work with today
  2. Open one copy of one of the following Shared Docs:  Period 1 / Period 3 / Period 4 / Period 6
  3. Make a copy of the document you opened, then share it with your group members. 
  4. Using the information in the document, you'll begin creating a perfect paragraph that uses -- and correctly cites-- at least four (4) different sources of information. Here's how:
    1. At the top or bottom of the list of information, find a place for your work. Type a topic sentence for your paragraph. Since the subject of your paragraph will be the invention and impact of the elevator, something like this would work: One of the most overlooked technologies in changing people's lives at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th Centuries was the elevator. or The invention of the elevator changed people's lives. or Without a new invention that allowed people to move vertically with ease came along, the modern city would not have been possible. You get the idea. With your partners, compose a broad topic sentence that sets the tone for what you are about to write. 
    2. After your topic sentence, choose some information from one of your sources that would be a logical place to start your discussion of the elevator. It can be a quotation (don't lose the quotation marks) or a paraphrase, or a piece of summarized information. You may cut & paste the information, but make sure that you:
    3. Cite the source correctly. 
    4. Repeat steps 2 & 3 three more times, using 3 more sources, until you have a topic sentence, then four more sentences, each with a different citation. 
    5. Add a closing sentence, summing up some of the key ideas you've presented.
    6. Finally, create a perfectly fomatted list of references (just like you did on Friday) but using only the 4 sources you actually used in your paragraph. Your finished work will look something like this:
 
 Here's a topic sentence. This information adds information about my topic from one of my sources (Source). Then, there's another bit of information (Reference). I might also add a "quotation or two" (Citation). And then I would want to add one more to make a total of four different sources (Ideas).  And then I'd sum it all up with a nice closing sentence. 

Works Cited

Citation, Cindy. "Elevators in My Life." Website Title. January 12, 2011. Web. June 10, 2013.

Ideas, Ira. "Otis and the Elevator." Website Title. September 7, 2005. Web. June 10, 2013.

Reference, Randy. "The Elevator and Its Inventors." Website Title. October 1, 2009. Web. June 10, 2013.

Source, Sarah. "Ups and Downs of the Elevator." Website Title. April 4, 2010. Web. June 10, 2013. 


   Like last week, the focus here should be on 100% perfection. Take your time. Ask questions. Talk to each other. Figure it out. 

When finished, hand in your group's work by putting it in the daily work dropbox. 

June 7

posted Jun 7, 2013, 5:49 AM by Peter Knowles

Day 84--

Learning Target ImageWhat will I be able to do when I've finished this lesson?How will I  accomplish this task?  How will I show that I have done this?How well will I have to do this?
 I will understand how to accurately collect and cite information for academic research.I will work with a group to collect information from a web page.  I will create accurate notecards to show what I've found on the web pageThis is a formative assessment to review and prepare for my final. 

REMEMBER YOUR DEADLINES:
ANY LATE ASSESSMENTS are due TODAY, June 7 at midnight. IF YOU HAVEN'T TURNED IN ANY ASSESSMENTS THIS SEMESTER AND YOU WANT ANY CREDIT FOR THEM, THEY ARE DUE TONIGHT AT MIDNIGHT.

ALSO: All retakes of any tests must be completed by June 11 (next Tuesday). Mr Knowles will be available at lunch on Friday, Monday, and Tuesday to give them, or after school on those dates, by appointment. 


Today we continue reviewing for the class final. Most groups have handed in their reference cards and notes from the last two days of classes, so you'll have a chance to move on to the next step today. To prepare you for that step, we'll watch a short video about formatting your list of Works Cited:

YouTube Video


Now that you've had a chance to review the guidelines for a correctly formatted list of works cited, it's time to put your knowledge into practice.


NOTE: If you and your group have NOT yet finished yesterday's assignment, scroll down this page to find where you left off and continue from there. 

If you're ready to move on, here's what you need to do:
  1. With your group, open ONE copy of your class period's works cited list below, then MAKE A COPY that you can type in, and SHARE it with members of your group.
  2. Go through each of the 8 source citations in your list and, as a group, correct them. Make each individual item perfect (They were supposed to be perfect when they were turned in yesterday, but there are still a few problems with some of them.)
  3. Once all the individual citations are correct, it's time to fix the list as a whole. Use what you know about a properly formatted list of works cited (from the video, from discussion, or from this page) to make your list 100% Correct. Work together to make your entire list PERFECT. 
  4. Once your list is 100% perfect, turn in ONE copy to the Daily Work Dropbox.
Here are the lists for your class:

Period 1  /  Period 3  /  Period 4  /  Period 6



If you're still working on yesterday's assignment, you can find it below.



You and your group members were assigned ONE of the sources below to collect some basic information and research about a common topic.

  1. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/elevator-inventor.html

  2. http://inventors.about.com/od/estartinventions/a/Elevator.htm

  3. http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/elevator.htm

  4. http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi279.htm

  5. http://www.howstuffworks.com/innovation/inventions/who-invented-the-elevator.htm

  6. http://web.mit.edu/invent/iow/otis.html

  7. http://www.invent.org/hall_of_fame/115.html

  8. http://www.archdaily.com/354494/a-brief-interesting-history-of-the-otis-elevator-company/


No matter which of the sources you and your group is assigned, you need to do the same things:


STEP ONE:

FIRST, use one of the note cards you receive to write a correct, legible REFERENCE CARD that contains all the necessary pieces of information. Work with your group members and available resources to make sure it is 100% correct.


 Author's last name, First name. 
"Title of Web Page."
Title of Web Site.
Date of last update or copyright.
Web.
Date that you last visited the site. 


NEXT, you’ll also be turning in a Google Docs version of your work, so you and your group will need to type what you’ve put on your reference card

Make sure it is 100% correct.


STEP TWO:

Once you’ve got your reference written and typed, it’s time to collect some information about your topic.

Read through the information on your assigned page, looking for information that is interesting or that seems important in some way.

Using three more of the reference cards, you and your group need to write correct, legible note cards. Create one of each of these:

  • Quote directly, word for word, from the page. MAKE SURE the words you quote are in quotation marks.

    Sample:

     
    "The first elevator shaft (built in 1853) actually preceded the first elevator by about four years; architect Peter Cooper, confident that a safe elevator would soon be invented, designed New York’s Union Foundation building with a cylindrical shaft (thinking that the most efficient shape). Otis would later design a special elevator just for the building."


  • Paraphrase (rewrites in your own words) DIFFERENT information from the page. Do not put quotation marks on this one.

    Sample:

     
    Otis made a spectacular attempt to show the safety of his invention by putting on a display at the World's Fair in 1854. He would rise above the crowd on an open platform, then cut the rope holding his elevator in place. People were sure he would crash, but the safety brake he had invented kept his elevator in place.


  • Collect and list (summarize) some facts, figures, dates, statistics, etc. from the page. No quotation marks here, either.


    1853 - Otis invented the safety brake for the elevator
    1854 - Otis demonstrated his invention at the New York World's Fair
    1857 - First passenger elevator was installed in a building



NEXT, add the information from your three different note cards you’ve collected to your Google Doc.  Again, make sure your work is 100% correct.


STEP THREE:

Title your Google Doc THE SAME NAME AS YOUR SOURCE’S AUTHOR and turn it in to the daily work dropbox. Make sure all your group members’ names are on the Google Doc

Write your names on the back of each note card too, and hand those in. There should be a total of four cards (1 reference, 1 quote, 1 paraphrase, 1 summary of information)


STEP FOUR:

If you've finished the first three steps in this process, you're doing great! 

Take some time now to try to find an answer to one of the bullet questions above. (The list of things you need to know for the final). You'll notice that most of them have links to information that can help answer the questions. As an INDIVIDUAL, choose one of the questions to find the answer to. It should be different than anyone else in your group. See what you can learn about the possible answer and share it with your group members, by discussing what you find, and by adding it to your group Google Document. (You've already shared it, so you don't have to do that again)


Finals schedule

 Thursday, June 13 Pd 4 Final (8:15-9:45)   Pd 6 Final (12:50-2:20)
   
 Friday, June 14 Pd 1 Final (8:15-10:00) Pd 3 Final (10:15-12:00)

World History Final: 2013

All year long you’ve been asked to conduct various levels of research writing, where you respond to a question about some aspect of history, and you then explain how YOU understand the material in your answer. When you do this, you need to show the source of all your information using standard research practices, using in-text citations, lists of works cited, and reference formats following a particular set of rules.

Your course final will focus on all these skills, so it’s time to figure them out if you haven’t already.

In the (few) days ahead, we’ll be doing a number of short activities to help you understand (if you don’t already) how to complete all these research steps correctly, and how to recognize when others make mistakes in those areas.

THE FINAL TEST WILL NOT BE OPEN NOTE (You won’t even have your Chromebooks! and all those helpful posters on the wall will be gone) so if you haven’t internalized the rules by now, pay attention, make good use of this time to practice, and get ready by studying for your course final. It’s your last chance to improve your grade...or keep your grade where you want it.


To do well, you’ll need to know:


Online sources to help you if necessary:

OWL at Purdue, MLA Resources

MLA Style guide for High School Students

Works Cited 4U

Citing Research using MLA Guidelines


And of course, what we’re doing in class for the next few days will help you too.


HOMEWORK:

Missing assessments (due tonight, 6/7), or retakes of tests if you're interested (to be completed by Tuesday, 6/11).



June 6

posted Jun 5, 2013, 3:05 PM by Peter Knowles   [ updated Jun 6, 2013, 4:48 AM ]

Day 83--

Learning Target ImageWhat will I be able to do when I've finished this lesson?How will I  accomplish this task?  How will I show that I have done this?How well will I have to do this?
 I will understand how to accurately collect and cite information for academic research.I will work with a group to collect information from a web page.  I will create accurate notecards to show what I've found on the web pageThis is a formative assessment to review and prepare for my final. 

REMEMBER YOUR DEADLINES:
ANY LATE ASSESSMENTS are due Friday, June 7 at midnight. IF YOU HAVEN'T TURNED IN ANY ASSESSMENTS THIS SEMESTER AND YOU WANT ANY CREDIT FOR THEM, THEY ARE DUE TOMORROW NIGHT AT MIDNIGHT.

ALSO: All retakes of any tests must be completed by June 11 (next Tuesday). Mr Knowles will be available at lunch on Friday, Monday, and Tuesday to give them, or after school on those dates, by appointment. 


Today we continue reviewing for the class final. Here's a review of what we discussed yesterday. Take a look at it if you need a refresher, then scroll down to where you and your group finished yesterday's class (Probably Step ONE, maybe Step TWO...)

Finals schedule

 Thursday, June 13 Pd 4 Final (8:15-9:45)   Pd 6 Final (12:50-2:20)
   
 Friday, June 14 Pd 1 Final (8:15-10:00) Pd 3 Final (10:15-12:00)

World History Final: 2013

All year long you’ve been asked to conduct various levels of research writing, where you respond to a question about some aspect of history, and you then explain how YOU understand the material in your answer. When you do this, you need to show the source of all your information using standard research practices, using in-text citations, lists of works cited, and reference formats following a particular set of rules.

Your course final will focus on all these skills, so it’s time to figure them out if you haven’t already.

In the (few) days ahead, we’ll be doing a number of short activities to help you understand (if you don’t already) how to complete all these research steps correctly, and how to recognize when others make mistakes in those areas.

THE FINAL TEST WILL NOT BE OPEN NOTE (You won’t even have your Chromebooks! and all those helpful posters on the wall will be gone) so if you haven’t internalized the rules by now, pay attention, make good use of this time to practice, and get ready by studying for your course final. It’s your last chance to improve your grade...or keep your grade where you want it.


To do well, you’ll need to know:


Online sources to help you if necessary:

OWL at Purdue, MLA Resources

MLA Style guide for High School Students

Works Cited 4U

Citing Research using MLA Guidelines


And of course, what we’re doing in class for the next few days will help you too.

You and your group members were assigned ONE of the sources below to collect some basic information and research about a common topic.

  1. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/elevator-inventor.html

  2. http://inventors.about.com/od/estartinventions/a/Elevator.htm

  3. http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/elevator.htm

  4. http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi279.htm

  5. http://www.howstuffworks.com/innovation/inventions/who-invented-the-elevator.htm

  6. http://web.mit.edu/invent/iow/otis.html

  7. http://www.invent.org/hall_of_fame/115.html

  8. http://www.archdaily.com/354494/a-brief-interesting-history-of-the-otis-elevator-company/


No matter which of the sources you and your group is assigned, you need to do the same things:


STEP ONE:

FIRST, use one of the note cards you receive to write a correct, legible REFERENCE CARD that contains all the necessary pieces of information. Work with your group members and available resources to make sure it is 100% correct.


 Author's last name, First name.
"Title of Web Page."
Title of Web Site.
Date of last update or copyright.
Web.
Date that you last visited the site.


NEXT, you’ll also be turning in a Google Docs version of your work, so you and your group will need to type what you’ve put on your reference card

Make sure it is 100% correct.


STEP TWO:

Once you’ve got your reference written and typed, it’s time to collect some information about your topic.

Read through the information on your assigned page, looking for information that is interesting or that seems important in some way.

Using three more of the reference cards, you and your group need to write correct, legible note cards. Create one of each of these:

  • Quote directly, word for word, from the page. MAKE SURE the words you quote are in quotation marks.

    Sample:

     
    "The first elevator shaft (built in 1853) actually preceded the first elevator by about four years; architect Peter Cooper, confident that a safe elevator would soon be invented, designed New York’s Union Foundation building with a cylindrical shaft (thinking that the most efficient shape). Otis would later design a special elevator just for the building."


  • Paraphrase (rewrites in your own words) DIFFERENT information from the page. Do not put quotation marks on this one.

    Sample:

     
    Otis made a spectacular attempt to show the safety of his invention by putting on a display at the World's Fair in 1854. He would rise above the crowd on an open platform, then cut the rope holding his elevator in place. People were sure he would crash, but the safety brake he had invented kept his elevator in place.


  • Collect and list (summarize) some facts, figures, dates, statistics, etc. from the page. No quotation marks here, either.


    1853 - Otis invented the safety brake for the elevator
    1854 - Otis demonstrated his invention at the New York World's Fair
    1857 - First passenger elevator was installed in a building



NEXT, add the information from your three different note cards you’ve collected to your Google Doc.  Again, make sure your work is 100% correct.


STEP THREE:

Title your Google Doc THE SAME NAME AS YOUR SOURCE’S AUTHOR and turn it in to the daily work dropbox. Make sure all your group members’ names are on the Google Doc

Write your names on the back of each note card too, and hand those in. There should be a total of four cards (1 reference, 1 quote, 1 paraphrase, 1 summary of information)


STEP FOUR:

If you've finished the first three steps in this process, you're doing great! 

Take some time now to try to find an answer to one of the bullet questions above. (The list of things you need to know for the final). You'll notice that most of them have links to information that can help answer the questions. As an INDIVIDUAL, choose one of the questions to find the answer to. It should be different than anyone else in your group. See what you can learn about the possible answer and share it with your group members, by discussing what you find, and by adding it to your group Google Document. (You've already shared it, so you don't have to do that again)


HOMEWORK:

Missing assessments (due tomorrow, 6/7), or retakes of tests if you're interested (to be completed by Tuesday, 6/11).


June 5

posted Jun 5, 2013, 7:04 AM by Peter Knowles   [ updated Jun 5, 2013, 2:33 PM ]

Day 82--

Learning Target ImageWhat will I be able to do when I've finished this lesson?How will I  accomplish this task?  How will I show that I have done this?How well will I have to do this?
 I will understand how to accurately collect and cite information for academic research.I will work with a group to collect information from a web page.  I will create accurate notecards to show what I've found on the web pageThis is a formative assessment to review and prepare for my final. 

Monday was your unit test, and you'll get it back today. 
RETAKES, if you want one, are available for the next week. All retakes of any tests must be completed by June 11 (next Tuesday)

Yesterday, your last written assessment was due. If you didn't turn it in yet, work on it outside of class to complete it and turn it in as soon as possible. ANY LATE ASSESSMENTS are due Friday, June 7 at midnight. After that, they will become a permanent zero in the gradebook. Rewrites of assessments you've already turned in will be accepted through next week. 

Today we begin reviewing for the class final

Finals schedule

 Thursday, June 13 Pd 2 Final (8:15-9:45)   Pd 6 Final (12:50-2:20)
   
 Friday, June 14 Pd 1 Final (8:15-10:00) Pd 3 Final (10:15-12:00)


World History Final: 2013

All year long you’ve been asked to conduct various levels of research writing, where you respond to a question about some aspect of history, and you then explain how YOU understand the material in your answer. When you do this, you need to show the source of all your information using standard research practices, using in-text citations, lists of works cited, and reference formats following a particular set of rules.

Your course final will focus on all these skills, so it’s time to figure them out if you haven’t already.

In the (few) days ahead, we’ll be doing a number of short activities to help you understand (if you don’t already) how to complete all these research steps correctly, and how to recognize when others make mistakes in those areas.

THE FINAL TEST WILL NOT BE OPEN NOTE (You won’t even have your Chromebooks! and all those helpful posters on the wall will be gone) so if you haven’t internalized the rules by now, pay attention, make good use of this time to practice, and get ready by studying for your course final. It’s your last chance to improve your grade...or keep your grade where you want it.


To do well, you’ll need to know:

  • What makes a good thesis statement?

  • What kind of information needs to be cited?

  • How do you create clear and accurate citations?

  • How do you blend information from multiple sources in a single paragraph?

  • What kind of information goes in citations?

  • What kind of punctuation is used for citations?

  • How do you create references for common types of sources?

  • What are the proper formats and titles for reference lists?

  • What kinds of formats are used to identify your sources?

  • How do references and citations work together to show the source of your information?

  • What is a primary source?

  • How do you use primary sources?


Online sources to help you if necessary:

OWL at Purdue, MLA Resources

MLA Style guide for High School Students

Works Cited 4U

Citing Research using MLA Guidelines


And of course, what we’re doing in class for the next few days will help you too.

Today we begin with a short video.

Then, we'll divide into groups of 3 or 4 to review and practice some important skills that you'll be tested on next week.

Follow the instructions below:

To begin our review of the research/writing/citing process, we will be conducting some class activities that mirror what you go through when you do research on your own.


To begin, you and your group members will use ONE of the sources below to collect some basic information and research about a common topic. (You’ll be assigned one)


  1. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/elevator-inventor.html

  2. http://inventors.about.com/od/estartinventions/a/Elevator.htm

  3. http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/elevator.htm

  4. http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi279.htm

  5. http://www.howstuffworks.com/innovation/inventions/who-invented-the-elevator.htm

  6. http://web.mit.edu/invent/iow/otis.html

  7. http://www.invent.org/hall_of_fame/115.html

  8. http://www.archdaily.com/354494/a-brief-interesting-history-of-the-otis-elevator-company/


No matter which of the sources you and your group is assigned, you need to do the same things:


STEP ONE:

FIRST, use one of the note cards you receive to write a correct, legible REFERENCE CARD that contains all the necessary pieces of information. Work with your group members and available resources to make sure it is 100% correct.

NEXT, you’ll also be turning in a Google Docs version of your work, so you and your group will need to type what you’ve put on your reference card. Make sure it is 100% correct.


STEP TWO:

Once you’ve got your reference written, it’s time to collect some information about your topic.

Read through the information on your assigned page, looking for information that is interesting or that seems important in some way.

Using three more of the reference cards, you and your group need to write correct, legible note cards. Create one of each of these:

  • Quote directly, word for word, from the page. MAKE SURE the words you quote are in quotation marks.

  • Paraphrase (rewrites in your own words) information from the page. Do not put quotation marks on this one.

  • Collect and list (summarize) some facts, figures, dates, statistics, etc. from the page. No quotation marks here, either.

NEXT, add the information from your three different note cards you’ve collected to your Google Doc.  Again, make sure your work is 100% correct.


STEP THREE:

Title your Google Doc THE SAME NAME AS YOUR SOURCE’S AUTHOR and turn it in to the daily work dropbox. Make sure all your group members’ names are on the Google Doc

Write your names on the back of each note card too, and hand those in.


June 4

posted Jun 4, 2013, 5:22 AM by Peter Knowles   [ updated Jun 4, 2013, 5:23 AM ]

Day 81--

Learning Target ImageWhat will I be able to do when I've finished this lesson?How will I  accomplish this task?  How will I show that I have done this?How well will I have to do this?
 I will be able to understand how the  Industrial Revolution led to changes in many areas of people's lives.I will use my own notes and assignments to take my unit test.  I will take an open-note unit testThis is a summative assessment and will have an impact on my course grade. 

Yesterday was your unit test, and you'll get it back today. 

RETAKES, if you want one, are available for the next week. All retakes of tests must be completed by June 11 (next Tuesday)


But today's forcus should be on your written assessment, due today. 

Remember, you're trying to answer the question:
How do new inventions and technologies lead to geographic, economic, and social changes in the way people live their lives?

If you're still collecting information on your review chart to help you figure out how you'll answer it, you may want to return to last week's assignment pages (Friday's has links for primary sources; Thursday's has links to other websites).

But if you're done with that and are wondering how to get started, here are some ideas for how you might organize your writing.

To answer the question completely, you'll need to deal with geographic, economic, and social changes while you show you understand the larger issues of the Industrial Revolution. So here are two ways you could organize your written response.**

 Organized by....     Theme    Invention 
 IntroductionGradual introduction with thesis statementGradual introduction with thesis statement
 Body Parag 1    Overview of Industrial RevolutionOverview of Industrial Revolution        
 Body Parag 2Geographic changes, and the inventions that led to them Major invention #1, with info on how it changed people's lives geographically, economically, and/or socially
 Body Parag 3Economic changes, and the inventions that led to them Major invention #2, with info on how it changed people's lives geographically, economically, and/or socially
 Body Parag 4Social changes, and the inventions that led to them Major invention #3, with info on how it changed people's lives geographically, economically, and/or socially
Conclusion   Review and wrap-up of key ideasReview and wrap-up of key ideas
Works Cited    Properly formatted, complete Works Cited list Properly formatted, complete Works Cited list
** These are only 2 suggested ways you could organize your response. There are others, so feel free to approach it however you wish.
BUT whatever approach you use, make sure you:
  • include properly formatted citations for ALL outside information
  • include and explain at least ONE primary source in the essay
  • use transitions and framing sentences to show how your information supports your thesis statement
  • use unit vocabulary terms when appropriate
  • proofread / edit your finished writing before handing it in to the Assessment DropBox
See the scoring rubric for more information about what you need to include to earn your best score.

Assessment is due at Midnight tonight. 

June 3

posted Jun 3, 2013, 5:21 AM by Peter Knowles

Day 80--

Learning Target ImageWhat will I be able to do when I've finished this lesson?How will I  accomplish this task?  How will I show that I have done this?How well will I have to do this?
 I will be able to understand how the  Industrial Revolution led to changes in many areas of people's lives.I will use my own notes and assignments to take my unit test.  I will take an open-note unit testThis is a summative assessment and will have an impact on my course grade. 


Today you'll take your Unit Test. 

It's open-note, so get all your assignments together and/or open on your Chromebook so you're ready to go. 

If you have questions during the test, please raise your hand.


When finished with the test, turn your attention to the written assessment, due tomorrow. 
Remember, you're trying to answer the question:

How do new inventions and technologies lead to geographic, economic, and social changes in the way people live their lives?

If you're still collecting information on your review chart to help you figure out how you'll answer it, you may want to return to last week's assignment pages (Friday's has links for primary sources; Thursday's has links to other websites).

But if you're done with that and are wondering how to get started, here are some ideas for how you might organize your writing.

To answer the question completely, you'll need to deal with geographic, economic, and social changes while you show you understand the larger issues of the Industrial Revolution. So here are two ways you could organize your written response.**

 Organized by....     Theme    Invention 
 IntroductionGradual introduction with thesis statementGradual introduction with thesis statement
 Body Parag 1    Overview of Industrial RevolutionOverview of Industrial Revolution        
 Body Parag 2Geographic changes, and the inventions that led to them Major invention #1, with info on how it changed people's lives geographically, economically, and/or socially
 Body Parag 3Economic changes, and the inventions that led to them Major invention #2, with info on how it changed people's lives geographically, economically, and/or socially
 Body Parag 4Social changes, and the inventions that led to them  Major invention #3, with info on how it changed people's lives geographically, economically, and/or socially
Conclusion   Review and wrap-up of key ideasReview and wrap-up of key ideas
Works Cited    Properly formatted, complete Works Cited list Properly formatted, complete Works Cited list
** These are only 2 suggested ways you could organize your response. There are others, so feel free to approach it however you wish.
BUT whatever approach you use, make sure you:
  • include properly formatted citations for ALL outside information
  • include and explain at least ONE primary source in the essay
  • use transitions and framing sentences to show how your information supports your thesis statement
  • use unit vocabulary terms when appropriate
  • proofread / edit your finished writing before handing it in to the Assessment DropBox
See the scoring rubric for more information about what you need to include to earn your best score.

May 31

posted May 31, 2013, 5:38 AM by Peter Knowles

Day 79--


Learning Target ImageWhat will I be able to do when I've finished this lesson?How will I  accomplish this task?  How will I show that I have done this?How well will I have to do this?
 I will be able to understand facts how the  Industrial Revolution led to changes in many areas of people's lives.I will review materials from the unit to identify important technological innovations and the changes they brought to people's lives.  I will begin collecting information in a chart that helps identify where new technologies created change. This is a formative assessment. It will help me understand material that I'll use in my later summative assessments. 


Today you'll want to continue collecting information about technology in the Industrial Revolution that had an impact on the way people lived Geographically, Economically, and/or Socially. 
As you continue collecting information in your chart, it's worth paying attention to the areas where you still need information. For example, if you have lots of information in the Geographic and Economic columns, but not much in the Social, then you should look especially hard for technologies that had an impact on the Social lives of people at the time. You'll need to be able to explain how technology had an impact on ALL 3 of those areas, so be sure to collect enough information now that you'll have lots to discuss in your assessment. 

Resource requirements:
To earn full credit, you need to use and correctly document 3 resources in addition to the textbook. For each one you use, you'll need to list it on your list of Works Cited, and to cite it correctly in your writing. 
If you haven't found any good sources from the listed websites from yesterday's links...
...you might try doing a direct Internet search for one of the pieces of technology you want to focus on. If you know you want to find information that you can use in your assessment, you might want to add one of the key areas in your search. For example, you might search for "spinning jenny" and "economic impact".


NOTE: Putting the phrases in quotation marks as you search will keep your results focused on what you want)

REMEMBER to carefully show the source of information as you take notes. You might consider using color-coding to show the source of information.

Primary sources:
To earn full credit you must quote, cite, and explain at least one PRIMARY SOURCE from the time. If you haven't found one yet, you might try these sources. 
Paul Halsall's Internet History Sourcebook: Industrial Revolution and Second Industrial Revolution
Or maybe you'll use one of the many primary sources found in the textbook. 
Or perhaps you'll find one on one of the other pages you've used for research. 
Either way, be sure to explain the name of the person who you are quoting in your writing, quote the source accurately (and cite it, of course), and explain what it means. 

HOMEWORK: 
The written assessment is due Tuesday, June 4, @ midnight. 

But before that, on Monday, you'll have an in-class, multiple choice test. Be prepared for that by having all your completed assignments for the unit with you and ready to use on Monday. 

May 30

posted May 30, 2013, 5:58 AM by Peter Knowles   [ updated May 30, 2013, 6:00 AM ]

Day 78--

Learning Target ImageWhat will I be able to do when I've finished this lesson?How will I  accomplish this task?  How will I show that I have done this?How well will I have to do this?
 I will be able to understand facts how the  Industrial Revolution led to changes in many areas of people's lives.I will review materials from the unit to identify important technological innovations and the changes they brought to people's lives.  I will begin collecting information in a chart that helps identify where new technologies created change. This is a formative assessment. It will help me understand material that I'll use in my later summative assessments. 


Today we'll continue what we started yesterday, as we get ready for your next multiple choice test (on Monday, June 3) and written assessment (due Tuesday, June 4)

We've had only 3 textbook homework assignments this unit, and we'll use them today as we continue our review. Open YOUR copy of:
Next, open your copy of a document called Industrial Revolution Review Chart that you started yesterday. 

Remember that you're using this chart so you can review material, organize information, and begin preparing to write your final written assessment for this course, which answers the question: 
How do new inventions and technologies lead to geographic, economic, and social changes in the way people live their lives?

Once you get the hang of it, you can continue on your own or with a small group. You might start by making a list of the inventions, technologies, and innovations in the first column, then coming back to discuss and think about how they might have led to Geographic, Economic, and Social changes in people's lives. 

Because your written assessment requires you to use the textbook AND at least 3 other non-Wikipedia sources, here is a list of possible online resources to consult about technologies that might end up on your chart. 
REMEMBER to carefully show the source of information as you take notes. You might consider using color-coding to show the source of information, like the sample below.

INVENTION / TECHNOLOGY

NOTES/ DETAILS / COMMENTS

GEOGRAPHIC CHANGES

ECONOMIC CHANGES

SOCIAL CHANGES

SOURCE (Page # or Reference #)

Railroads/ trains

“The Rocket”

first ones weren’t that fast, but they got faster. Steam engines; helped United States expand.

In the U.S., the first transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869

Allowed people to live farther away from each other; it connected distant locations. 

Suddenly, travel across the US was quicker, safer, and easier.

Allowed products to move quickly, easily, less expensive

Have access to products from other areas; allowed people to travel more.

Construction required immigrant labor, especially from Ireland and China

(381-382, 383)



(Independence)



Looking ahead: If you'd like to take a look at the Scoring Rubric for your final written assessment, due Tuesday, June 4, it's available here

HOMEWORK -- 20 minutes --
Options for you to choose from:
  • Complete any past homework assignments that you have not yet finished. 
  • Continue working on today's review chart if you like; we'll work on it more in class tomorrow, but you might want to continue a bit outside of class. 
  • Organize your Google Drive documents into a unit folder if you haven't already.
  • Do some research about one of the pieces of technology that you think was very important during the Industrial Revolution. Take careful notes including source information. You can record it on your chart. 

May 29

posted May 29, 2013, 5:51 AM by Peter Knowles   [ updated May 30, 2013, 6:01 AM ]

Day 77--

Learning Target ImageWhat will I be able to do when I've finished this lesson?How will I  accomplish this task?  How will I show that I have done this?How well will I have to do this?
 I will be able to understand facts how the  Industrial Revolution led to changes in many areas of people's lives.I will review materials from the unit to identify important technological innovations and the changes they brought to people's lives.  I will begin collecting information in a chart that helps identify where new technologies created change. This is a formative assessment. It will help me understand material that I'll use in my later summative assessments. 


Yesterday you should have turned in the last of the homework assignments for this unit, so it's time to look back and see what we've learned and get ready for your next multiple choice test (on Monday, June 3) and written assessment (due Tuesday, June 4)

We've had only 3 textbook homework assignments this unit, and we'll use them today as we begin our review. Open YOUR copy of:
Next, open a new document called Industrial Revolution Review Chart, then make a copy for yourself that you can type in. 

As a class, we'll get this chart started so you can see how you can use it to review material, organize information, and begin preparing to write your final written assessment for this course, which answers the question: 
How do new inventions and technologies lead to geographic, economic, and social changes in the way people live their lives?

Once you get the hang of it, you can continue on your own or with a small group. You might start by making a list of the inventions, technologies, and innovations in the first column, then coming back to discuss and think about how they might have led to Geographic, Economic, and Social changes in people's lives. 

Looking ahead: If you'd like to take a look at the Scoring Rubric for your final written assessment, due Tuesday, June 4, it's available here

HOMEWORK -- 20 minutes --
Options for you to choose from:
  • Complete any past homework assignments that you have not yet finished. 
  • Continue working on today's review chart if you like; we'll work on it more in class tomorrow, but you might want to continue a bit outside of class. 
  • Organize your Google Drive documents into a unit folder if you haven't already.
  • Do some research about one of the pieces of technology that you think was very important during the Industrial Revolution. Take careful notes including source information. You can record it on your chart. 

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