October 17

posted Oct 17, 2011, 5:40 AM by Peter Knowles   [ updated Oct 17, 2011, 11:27 AM ]
History Standard
4.2 Understand and analyzes causal factors that have shaped major events in history.
Key Question (for your assessment, due Friday)

Where do turning points in history come from, and how do they lead to changes in events that follow?

Day # 31Date:  October 17, 2011Social Studies Standards  
Vocabulary Terms
Target Question
How do we know what year it is?WHAT YOU SHOULD LEARN TODAY
Content ObjectiveStudents will understand the different ways that years are commonly identifiedWHAT YOU SHOULD LEARN ABOUT THE SUBJECT
Language Objective   Students will become familiar with the abbreviations BC, AD, BCE, and CE; Students will verbally share information about turning points in history in small groups that they have previously collected.HOW YOU WILL COMMUNICATE WHAT YOU LEARN

Activity
Instructions
  1. Open your  "Turning Point Notes" assignment.You should have already shared your assignment with Mr. Knowles; if you haven't shared it yet, you should do so now. 
  2. Now that you've shared it, choose one of the turning point events that you consider to be more important than the rest. (Don't choose the first one, the Neolithic Revolution, that we talked about in class. Choose one that you found out about on your own). It could be the most important -- in your opinion -- or just in the top 3 or 4. Use the information on your assignment about that event to answer a few questions on a 3 x 5 card. (details in class)
  3. When you finish the survey, go to this web page to learn about the different ways that people talk about chronological time periods. When you're finished reading, you should know answers to the following questions (take notes if you like).
    1. What do the letters BC and AD stand for when it comes to talking about years in history?
    2. What do the letters BCE and CE stand for?
    3. How do the two systems relate to each other?
    4. Why do some people favor the BCE and CE system?
    5. Why do some people criticize it?
  4. If you're still a little fuzzy on the differences and definitions, take a look at the following slide show. 
On Chronography

5. If you're fine with the definitions, you may want to either download or continue learning how to use Prezi, to get ready for your timeline assignment that accompanies this week's assessment. Or take a look at the Extension suggestions below to learn more about how we manage our ideas about time.

STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT WHAT TO DO


REMEMBER: To do your best on summative assessments, you'll need to use not only the information that we've discussed in class, but also include information from outside of classroom activities, either from information you already know, or from additional research you complete. Conduct your own research if necessary, or visit the Extension link below for ideas.
Formative AssessmentBe ready to discuss the Turning Point you chose in step 2 AND be prepared to work with the information you collected in steps 3 & 4.HOW YOU WILL DEMONSTRATE WHAT YOU'VE LEARNED TODAY
Summative Assessment

DUE 10/21
Our next summative (graded) assessment will be a blog post in answer to the following question:  
Where do turning points in history come from, and how do they lead to changes in events that follow?
Start thinking about examples you learned about today. They will come in handy when you need to write about them later.
WHAT TO DO WHEN FINISHED WITH TODAY'S ACTIVITIES 
Extension
PREZI: If you complete the assessment early, with time remaining in class, you may want to help other students, or get a head start on tomorrow's assignment by downloading an app from the Chrome Web Store.
TIMELINES: If you're intrigued by the BC/AD vs. BCE/CE story, it doesn't end there. Take a look at this website to see how other cultures around the world and throughout history have looked at time. 
 
WHAT TO DO IF YOU'VE FINISHED THIS WEEK'S SUMMATIVE  ASSESSMENT, OR WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT TODAY'S TOPICS
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