November 16

posted Nov 16, 2011, 6:13 AM by Peter Knowles   [ updated Nov 16, 2011, 10:31 AM ]
Economics Standard 2.3 -- Understand the government's role in the economy.
Essential Question: What costs and benefits faced European nations as they attempted to create new trade routes?
Day # 52Date:  November 16, 2011Social Studies Standards  
Vocabulary Terms
Target QuestionWhere did explorers of the 15th and early 16th century focus their attention and travels?WHAT YOU SHOULD LEARN TODAY
Content ObjectiveStudents will understand the routes that early European explorers used to reach new markets.    WHAT YOU SHOULD LEARN ABOUT THE SUBJECT
Language Objective   Students will discuss routes of explorers as they complete a map of their travels.HOW YOU WILL COMMUNICATE WHAT YOU LEARN

Activity
Instructions
In Class Activity:

Start with a QUIZ over last night's homework assignment. You may use your assignment while you take the quiz, but do not use your textbook or help from another student. 


Last night's homework introduced you to a number of people who played a role in the Age of Exploration. To help you understand what they did, where they went, and which country they represented in their explorations, you'll be creating a map over the next week. Today, you can get started by showing the routes taken by the following people you read about in last night's homework. (Page numbers are shown to help you find information you might need)
Marco Polo (194)
Bartolomeu Dias (196)
Vasco da Gama (196)
Christopher Columbus (196)
Ferdinand Magellan (196-7)
If you're having trouble figuring out information about any of these explorers or where they went, you might want to consult the database of explorers at the Mariner's Museum online. Find the explorer you want, read about his travels, or click on the "Voyage Routes" link on the right hand side of the explorer's screen to find the actual route.
See the image below for how to do this:


Your map should represent careful and complete work. You'll work on it a bit each day, and your work should be neat and accurate, suitable for display when you're done. 

When finished with your map for the day, put it away carefully (you may leave it in class if you like) and get started on tonight's homework.

HOMEWORK:
Tonight's assignment Read "The Spanish Empire"(198-200) and "European Rivals" (201), then answer these questions:
  1. What similarities were there between the way the Spanish conquered the Aztecs and how they conquered the Incas? (198-199)
  2. What effects did the encomienda system have on the Native American populations? (199)
  3. What was the Columbian Exchange?
  4. Which direction did the Northern European nations (England, France and the Netherlands) commonly travel to find new trade routes?
  5. Which Northern European nation was unable to sustain its North American territories?
STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT WHAT TO DO


REMEMBER: To do your best on summative assessments, you'll need to use not only the information that we've discussed in class, but also include information from outside of classroom activities, either from information you already know, or from additional research you complete. Conduct your own research if necessary, or visit the Extension link below for ideas.
Formative AssessmentBe ready for a quiz on tonight's assignment when you get to class tomorrowHOW YOU WILL DEMONSTRATE WHAT YOU'VE LEARNED TODAY
Summative Assessment

DUE 11/23
Our next summative (graded) assessment will be a blog post in answer to the following question:  
What costs and benefits faced European nations as they attempted to create new trade routes?
Start thinking about examples you learned about today. They will come in handy when you need to write about them later.
WHAT TO DO WHEN FINISHED WITH TODAY'S ACTIVITIES 
Extension

Learn more about explorers from all around the world at the Mariners Museum
Learn more about Marco Polo and the Silk Road with these web resources
WHAT TO DO IF YOU'VE FINISHED THIS WEEK'S SUMMATIVE  ASSESSMENT, OR WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT TODAY'S TOPICS
ą
Peter Knowles,
Nov 16, 2011, 6:13 AM
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