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May 6

posted May 6, 2013, 5:43 AM by Peter Knowles   [ updated May 6, 2013, 8:58 AM ]
Day 62--


Learning Target ImageWhat will I be able to do when I've finished this lesson?How will I  accomplish this task?  How will I show that I have done this?How well will I have to do this?
 I will be able to understand the sequence of important events during the French Revolution.I will continue building on my descriptions of my timeline based on the 5 most important events from the Revolution.  I will turn in my descriptive paragraphs, then continue working on adding details and information. This is a formative assessment and will help me with my summative assessments in this assessment cycle.

Homework check: On Thursday you had a chance to create a timeline showing your choices of the 5 most important events in the French Revolution. Make sure your name is on your timeline (either front or back) and hand it in.

In addition to creating a visual timeline, you also had to create a brief written description of your choices. A sample of what your written descriptions should look like is shown below: 
 
 My second choice was the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. On this date, Japanese airplanes bombed the US Navy in Hawaii's harbor and led the United States to enter World War II. This was important because the United States played such a large role in the war, and if the attack hadn't happened, the United States might not have entered the war until much later, and maybe not until it was too late (Spielvogel 631). <---Explain the event

<----Then explain why you think it's important.

<---Cite your source of information when done

These descriptions will form the basis of your next written assessment, due Friday, May 10. And today you'll start working on adding to the information you've started with. 

Step 1) Make sure you have proper citations for the information you've included. 
In the example above, (Spielvogel 631) comes at the end of the paragraph. That's a correct citation, but it's not really in the right location. Instead of after the final sentence, which is the writer's explanation, it should come immediately after the information that can actually be found on page 631 of that book. In this case, it should come after the 2nd sentence of the paragraph, like this:
My second choice was the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. On this date, Japanese airplanes bombed the US Navy in Hawaii's harbor and led the United States to enter World War II (Spielvogel 631). This was important because the United States played such a large role in the war, and if the attack hadn't happened, the United States might not have entered the war until much later, and maybe not until it was too late.
To get your writing ready for the next step, move your citations to the proper locations in your paragraphs. Make sure the citation appears right after the information from the textbook, and immediately before the period that ends the sentence. 

Step 2) Add a list of references
So far, you've probably only used the textbook, but that will soon change. Before you get too far into it, though, you'll want to make sure you've got your first source of information correctly listed. Here's what you need to do:
  1. Move to the end of your document
  2. Type the title Works Cited
  3. Create a properly organized reference for the textbook. You may be able to copy and paste it from a previous assignment or assessment, or you can use the poster at the front of the classroom to help you.
Step 3) Begin adding information from other sources. 
You've already selected 5 important events from the revolution, and have already written a sentence or two about it, using the textbook as your source. Now it's time to add a little more information and details to your writing using outside sources. 
Using one of the sources below, find more information about the one of your event descriptions. 

Step 4) Create a reference for the site you decided to use. 
Once you find additional information, you'll need to add it to your paragraph, and then cite it correctly.  It's always easier to cite a source if you've created the reference for it already, so create a reference listing for it in your Works Cited list. Spielvogel should already be there; place the new one appropriately based on the author's last name, or on the title of the page if the author's name cannote be found. Here's help if you need it.

Step 5) Cite your new information.
Now that you know the author's last name or name of the page if the author cannot be found, you can add your citation. Put it right after the information from that source, and before the closing punctuation. Here's an example:
My second choice was the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. On this date, Japanese airplanes bombed the US Navy in Hawaii's harbor and led the United States to enter World War II (Spielvogel 631). Many people claim that although the Japanese had made threatening moves before that day, few in the United States expected an attack (Hargreaves). This was important an important event because the United States played such a large role in the war, and if the attack hadn't happened, the United States might not have entered the war until much later, and maybe not until it was too late.

Step 6) Repeat this proces for EACH of your five events.
You may re-use the source you just used a couple times, but you'll need to eventually use THREE sources in addition to your textbook. So feel free to use a couple of the other sources from step 3 above as you continue your work. 

Step 7) Add a primary source
When you've added a second source to EACH of your paragraphs, using the textbook and at least THREE other sources, you need to add one more source. 
A Primary source -- something from the time period in which the events occurred -- can help you make your writing clear and can give it added authenticity. So, if you haven't found a primary source in the textbook or in some other source yet, try using this website:
to find a primary source that fits with one of your events. 
When you use a primary source, quote directly from it, and be sure to identify the speaker or author in the text of your writing. Since the person who said or wrote your primary source is probably not the author of the website you're using, it's important to be clear about who said or wrote the words you've chosen to use. Here's more help for using the primary source correctly.
And be sure to add this source to your list of Works Cited at the end, and to cite it accurately when you use it.

Step 8) Check your list of Works Cited
Are all four (or more) sources listed?
Are they all listed by the author's last name (or, if you couldn't find it, by the name of the web page)?
Are they in alphabetical order?
Is the first word in each one used to create a citation at least once in your paragraphs?

Now you've written the body of your document and the necessary citations and references; next up -- introduction and conclusion. 

HOMEWORK: Complete your timeline; any other late assignments for the unit should also be completed. 

Coming up: Open note, multiple choice test will be Thursday, May 9. Your written assessment will be due the next day, on May 10.
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