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Create a reference

posted Jan 6, 2012, 8:46 AM by Peter Knowles   [ updated Jan 6, 2012, 9:03 AM ]
Whenever you use information from another source in a report, you need to show where you got the information. A key to that is showing very clearly what book, magazine, web page, or other source you used. There are a number of different standard formats for doing this. In this class, we will usually use something called MLA Format. Here's how:

Books

The basic format for sources with their own titles which are not part of a series is:

Author's Name, reversed order. Title of Book, italicized (or underlined if using a typewriter), all words capitalized except conjunctions, articles, and prepositions. Publication Information:(City of Publication: Publisher, Year.)

(In most books the title page gives you all you'll need for your reference listing except the date of publication, and you'll find that in the form of the copyright date on the next page)

Here are examples for works by....

Single author:
Adams, Ronald. The Life of Mark Twain. New York: Viking, 1967.
Two or three authors:
Norbert, Nicholas, Theresa Johnson, and Richard C. Smith. The Man Without Hope: Thomas Malthus and Victorian England. Westport: Greenwood Publishing, 1979.
More than three authors:
Bailyn, Bernard, et al. The Great Republic: A History of the American People. Lexington: Heath, 1977.
Later editions:
Coe, Michael D. The Maya, 4th ed. New York: Thames and London, 1987.
Corporate author (no person credited for the work)
American Red Cross. Standard First Aid & Personal Safety, 2nd. ed. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1979.
Editor:
Apostolos-Cappadona, Diane, ed. Symbolism, the Sacred, and the Arts. New York: Crossroad, 1988.
More than one editor:
Barnet, Sylvan, Morton Berman, and William Burton, eds. An Introduction to Literature, 7th ed. Boston: Little, Brown, 1981.
Book by an author with an editor;
Dickens, Charles. David Copperfield. Ed. James K. Robinson. New York: Norton, 1977.
Second book by the same author:
    .... Oliver Twist. New York: Norton, 1962.

 

Magazines

The basic format for sources which are part of a series or collection is:

Author's Name, reversed order. "Title of Article, Essay, or Story." in quotation marks. Title of Larger Work, italicized (or underlined if using a typewriter), all words capitalized except conjunctions, articles, and prepositions. Publication Information: (Date of publication: page numbers of article.)

Examples for works from...

Magazine article, for magazine published weekly
Davidson, Joanne. "The Fight for the Fish." Time 12 Sept. 1994, 41-44.
Magazine article, for magazine published monthly
Borroff, Marie. "The Malthusian Connection." Smithsonian Oct. 1988: 35-41.
Newspaper article
Hellmich, Nanci. "College Studies Are Often a Full-time Job." USA Today 11 Sept. 1990: 1D.
Article with no author (magazine, newspaper, etc.)
*Use appropriate format with article's title as your starting point:
"Fertilizing Trees and Shrubs." Southern Living Feb. 1980: 170-71.
Anthologies, collections, etc.
Donaldson, Marie. "All the Truth I Ever Wanted." Donaldson Alive and Well. Boston: Little, Brown, 1990: 47-58.

Encyclopedias

Encyclopedia article
Bolle, Kees W. "Myth and Mythology: The Nature, Functions, and Types of Myth." The New Encyclopedia Britannica: Macropaedia. 15th ed. 1986. 24: 710-720.

Electronic Sources

 World Wide Web sites

Format: Author (if known) . Full title of the page, in quotation marks. Full title of site (if different) in italics. Date of publication or last revision. The word Web. Date of visit or download.

Example: Walker, Janice R. "Walker/ACW Style Sheet". The Columbia Guide to Online Style. Nov. 1997. Web. Sept. 1, 1998.

Web page with no author
*Use appropriate format with article's title as your starting point:
"Roman Laws." Ancient Roman Web. Nov. 22, 2003. Web. Jan. 4, 2011.

 Email

Format: Author's name or alias (if known), subject line from the posting in quotation marks, date of the message if different from the date accessed, the word Email. Date of access in parentheses.

Example: Lewis, Jerry. "Opening days" 29 Aug. 1998. Email. (30 Aug. 1998).


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