October 17

posted Oct 17, 2011, 6:02 AM by Peter Knowles   [ updated Oct 18, 2011, 6:37 AM ]
Civics Standard
Civics 1.1 Understand key ideals and principles of the United States, including those in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other fundamental documents.

Day # 32Date:  October 17, 2011Standards:  Social Studies  
Target Question
What rights do you have, and why do you have them?WHAT YOU SHOULD LEARN TODAY
Content ObjectiveStudents will understand some of the basic rights they have and where they come from.WHAT YOU SHOULD LEARN ABOUT THE SUBJECT
Language Objective   Students will discuss personal ideas about rights they have in small groups. Students will review vocabulary terms Expressed, Implied and Inherent, and will be introduced to the term "unalienable".HOW YOU WILL COMMUNICATE WHAT YOU LEARN

Activity
Instructions

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed..."

These instantly recognizable words from the Declaration of Independence speak of the "unalienable" rights of all people, and the role of government in keeping those rights safe. The words of the Declaration, and the Constitution's Bill of Rights that followed it, form the backdrop of our next unit in this course. The central focus that the nation's founders placed upon the rights of individuals remains a focus today, and one which, in an ever-changing society, is constantly tested by new interpretations, and questions about what the limits of our individual rights are when balanced against the common good.

To begin our unit, you and a few other students will brainstorm a list of the rights you have. 

Open a new Google Document per group, and make a list of rights that you can think of that you currently have. Try to divide your list into rights that are Expressed (named in so many words), Implied (necessary in order to exercise your Expressed rights), and Inherent (yours, simply because you are a human being). 

When you've completed your list, share it with Mr. Knowles, then begin your reading assignment (below) until other groups are ready to move on.  


HOMEWORK -- READ: The Unalienable Rights (Chapter 19.1, pages 485-489)and answer the questions below. 

1) According to the Declaration of Independence, why do governments exist? (486)

2) Why was the Due Process Clause so important in understanding what rights must be protected? (488)

3) Why is impossible to list all the rights that people have? (489)

STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT WHAT TO DO


REMEMBER: To do your best on summative assessments, you'll need to use not only the information that we've discussed in class, but also include information from outside of classroom activities, either from information you already know, or from additional research you complete. Conduct your own research if necessary, or visit the Extension link below for ideas.
Formative Assessment
HOW YOU WILL DEMONSTRATE WHAT YOU'VE LEARNED TODAY
Summative AssessmentOur next summative (graded) assessment will be a blog post in answer to the following question:  

WHAT TO DO WHEN FINISHED WITH TODAY'S ACTIVITIES 
Extension
WHAT TO DO IF YOU'VE FINISHED THIS WEEK'S SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT

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